POLICY STATEMENTS 
PAST POLICY STATEMENTS 

The second EU Work Plan for Sport (2014-2017) has come to an end and a new one (2017-2020), based on the Commission's evaluation, has been adopted in May by the EU Ministers responsible for sport at the Education, Youth, Culture and Sport Council meeting. It sets out the key topics that Member States and the Commission should prioritise until 2020: integrity of sport, the economic dimension of sport and sport and society.

2016

Young people are an important group taking part in sporting activities in many roles (athletes, volunteers, board members etc.). In Europe, 64% of 15-24 year-olds practice sports at least once a week, while the frequency of exercise tends to decrease with age (Eurobarometer 412 ”Sport and Physical Activity” 2015).

 

Representing youth in sports with a focus on the youth sport-for-all sector in Europe, ENGSO Youth calls the attention of the Council of the European Union, the Member States and the European Commission to some youth sport issues that shall be included into the future EU sport policy, especially the European Union Work Plan for Sport 2017 onwards (EU Work Plan for Sport).

2012

The Amsterdam Declaration was presented at the closing ceremony of the 8th World Conference on Sport, Education and Culture “Olympism powered by YOUth”. The declaration contains a set of recommendations ranging from the important role of the athletes’ entourage, next year’s fifth UNESCO World Sport Ministers Conference (MINEPS V), social media and the establishment of a value based educational programmes.

 

ENGSO Youth welcomes the Amsterdam Declaration while highlighting the unsatisfying involvement of youth in the conference as well as a lack of commitment towards further involvement, consultation, access and inclusion of youth had been put forward 2 years ago in the Durban Declaration

2010

Young people are an important group taking part in sporting activities as athletes, volunteers, officials, and in many other roles. In Europe, 61 % of 15–24 year-olds practice sports at least once a week, while the number of active people decreases with age. Furthermore, 49 % of young people declare that they are members of a sport club.

 

A broad understanding of youth sport is needed; sport should not only be seen as elite sport, and youth sport should not only be understood as aiming to the top. The European Union has already recognised the importance of sport and its social dimension. The Lisbon Treaty, article 165 (2), specifically states that the European Union shall take account of the social and educational function of sport while contributing to the promotion of European sporting issues. Along with youth specific provisions, the article also mentions the protection of young sportspeople.

 

The Commission’s White Paper on Sport already mentions the Youth in Action programme as an important instrument for encouraging young people's volunteering in sport in fields such as youth exchanges and voluntary service for sporting events, for promoting social inclusion through sport, for the prevention of discrimination, violence and racism in sport, and for promoting health-enhancing physical activity. Sport, notably physical education and cooperation between youth workers and sport organisations, is also mentioned in the EU Youth Strategy. Sport was also among the top concerns mentioned by young people in a related consultation.

 

Underlining the need to have a European youth programme also in the future, ENGSO Youth would like to highlight some key aspects related to sport and youth as a response to the public consultation on the future European programme in the field of youth. 

2010

ENGSO Youth welcomes the sports provisions of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and the supporting, coordinating and supplementing measures that are now enabled. When implementing these provisions, ENGSO Youth encourages the decision-makers to assume a broad understanding of sport. Sport should not only be seen as elite sport, and youth sport should not only be understood as aiming to the top. In our view, the Treaty gives good support to this broad defi nition of sport with its reference to the social and educational function of sport.

 

Young people are an important group taking part in sporting activities as athletes, volunteers, offi cials, and many other roles. In Europe, 61% of 15-24 year-olds practice sports at least once a week (Eurobarometer 334 ”Sport and Physical Activity” 2010), while the number of active people decreases with age. As for the younger population, the numbers seem to be even higher: for example, in Finland 92% of all children aged 3–18 years practice sports, and 43% are members of a sport club.

 

The Olympic movement has recently started adding emphasis on young people. They took a while to understand that youth is important – it’s about time the EU understands that, also!

2009

ENGSO Youth welcomes the New EU Strategy for Youth, which outlines the priorities of the European Union's policy and action in the youth field for the coming years. Especially, ENGSO Youth welcomes the inclusion of health and sport as fields of action as part of improving access and full participation of young people in society.

 

We would like to emphasise that sport can be an excellent tool for achieving many of the other priorities of the strategy as well, which is why we encourage enhanced cross-sectoral cooperation described in point 5.1 of the strategy not only in the fields of youth, health and sport, but also between youth sport and the other areas included in the strategy. Sport is a non-verbal form of communication, with the ability to cross all boundaries. It brings people together and generates solidarity, tolerance and fair play, it can support employability of young people, it includes an element of non-formal learning and it is a major sector in volunteering – sport is an excellent tool for promoting the priorities set in the New EU Strategy for Youth. To demonstrate this, ENGSO Youth would like to share with you this example of a youth sport project involving young people with fewer opportunities.

2009

ENGSO Youth welcomes the publication of the EU guidelines for physical activity. The Guidelines provide guidance for the development of national plans to promote physical activity. Due to the often confirmed and consolidated findings about the widespread unhealthy and physically inactive lifestyle amongst Europeans of all age groups, the introduction of national plans within the EU member states is a necessity.

2008

ENGSO Youth is the youth organisation of ENGSO (European Non-Governmental Sport Organisation). ENGSO Youth is the youth sport-for-all organisation at European level. It has 41 member organisations, which are national umbrella organisations for sport from across Europe. ENGSO Youth represents youth sports in the Council of Europe's comanagement system.

 

ENGSO Youth is a non profit organisation and has the aim to represent the interests of people under the age of 35 dealing with sport in Europe. Youth sport for all is our main focus. We promote sport and health, participation and volunteering of children and young people in sports and international cooperation.

 

The main activities of ENGSO Youth are:

  • Networking;

  • Offering a discussion platform for current sport political issues in the field of youth;

  • Exchange of ideas on national sports developments in the field of youth;

  • Seeking common positions on sport issues in the field of youth and publicising these positions;

  • Strengthening the cooperation with other bodies dealing with children and youth matters.

2008

We, the undersigning organisations:

the European Volunteer Centre (CEV), the European Youth Forum (YFJ), the Association of Voluntary Service Organisations (AVSO), the World Scouts Movement, the Red Cross/European Union Office, Caritas Europa, Volonteurope, AGE, Solidar, ENGAGE, Johanniter International, the European Non-Governmental Sports Organization (ENGSO and ENGSO Youth), Youth Action for Peace (YAP).

 

Call upon the European institutions to declare 2011 as the European Year of Volunteering. We represent thousands of organizations at local, regional, national, European and international level involving millions of volunteers. We are ready and committed to contributing in order to make the European Year of Volunteering 2011 a lasting success. 

2007

ENGSO Youth is the youth organisation of ENGSO (European Non-Governmental Sport Organisation). ENGSO Youth is the youth sport-for-all organisation at European level. It has 40 member organisations, which are national umbrella organisations for sport from across Europe. ENGSO Youth is a non profit organisation and has the aim:

  • To represent the interest of people under the age of 35 dealing with sport in Europe.

The main activities of ENGSO Youth are

  • Networking;

  • Offering a discussion platform for current sport political issues in the field of youth;

  • Exchange of ideas on national sports developments in the field of youth;

  • Seeking common positions on sport issues in the field of youth and publicising these positions;

  • Strengthening the cooperation with other bodies dealing with children and youth matters. ENGSO Youth welcomes the implementation of Youth Olympic Games. The following recommendations are to be seen as ideas developed and submitted by young people to be taken into account while planning the Youth Olympic Games.

1998

The document includes 12 recommendations, which cover the following:

  1. Links between the sports organisation and the school system.

  2. Increase access to sports facilities.

  3. Training and competition Guidelines.

    1. The content of activities.

    2. Avoid placing too much pressure on children and young people. 

    3. Objectives and value basis for children and young people. 

  4. Quality assurance of the training and education of teachers, coaches and leaders. 

  5. All children and young people must be provided with an adequate and appropriate amount of time of physical education and sports activities.

  6. The social possibilities of sport. 

  7. Code of Ethics for Children and Youth Sport.

  8. Preventing drop-out from sports activities.

  9. Right of co-determination for children and young people.

  10. Developing of responsibility and leadership.

  11. Insurance schemes. 

  12. Environmental protection measures in the sports organisation.   

2017

The European Youth Sport Forum 2017 (#EYSF2017) gathered 120 young leaders in the youth and sport sector from across Europe. The Forum took place in Malta, from 10th to 13th March, during the Maltese Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

 

Participants, aged 18-35, were selected to exchange ideas and practices, and to develop a set of recommendations and actions on the topics of healthy lifestyle, social inclusion and volunteering, and sport diplomacy. These topics were formally identified as the key priorities in the frame of the Maltese presidency.

 

During the EYSF 2017, non-formal learning methods (workshops, discussion groups based on input from keynote speakers) were used in order to give participants the chance to actively contribute in all aspects of the Forum. It gave young leaders the opportunity to voice their opinions and exchange ideas about the current issues and challenges regarding the topics of the Forum, thereby continuing the event’s legacy of almost two decades.

 

EYSF 2017 Pink Paper recommendations put forward by the youth delegates will be communicated to the European Commission, and the leading stakeholders in the youth and sport sector. The Pink Paper aims to further inform and prompt decision makers to change agendas on values, priorities and concerns of the European youth already having an impact at a local, national and European level. It serves as the active contribution and engagement of Europe’s youth within the European Work Plan for Sport, the Europe 2020 and the Global Agenda 2030.

 

European stakeholders in sport have not yet developed a context in which young people are institutionally represented in the decision making, planning, shaping and execution of EU sports policies and we therefore present the following Pink Paper. The document reflects the genuine concerns of young people in Europe for consideration in developing the forthcoming sports policies.

2012

The European Youth and Sport Forum 2012 (#EYSF 2012) gathered 83 young leaders in sports from 28 di erent European countries. Following the European Union Presidency the Forum took place in Larnaca, Cyprus, from the 25th of November to the 1st of December.

This declaration consists of recommendations connected to the themes of the Forum, health, participation and volunteering. The participants have also produced a collection of practises showing excellent examples implemented in the participating countries.

It is designed to assist the European Commission, the Council of Europe, Non-Governmental Organisations and other stakeholders within the European youth and sport sectors in initialising and carrying on their decision making processes in sports and physical activity.

During the Forum, non-formal learning methods were used, such as Workshops and discussions combined with expert input in order to give participants the chance to actively contribute in all stages of the Forum.

#EYSF2012 gave young leaders in sports an opportunity to voice their opinions and exchange ideas about the current situation regarding health, participation and volunteering. The recommendations re ect true concerns of young people throughout Europe and therefore should be seriously considered. 

2012

The European Youth and Sport Forum (EYSF2012) was a 6 days event (25/11-1/12) gathering over 80 young leaders from across Europe from 25 November to 1 December in Larnaca, Cyprus.

Organised with the support of the European Commission and the European Youth Foundation, the Forum EYSF2012 has been designed to provide a large scale platform on which projects and good practices can be presented, networking stimulated and new projects for the future set-up.


The aim was to empower the next generation of grassroots sports leaders and provide them room to make their voice heard.


The youth generation has its word to say and its own vision on some key issue for the future of sport and is ready to share it! 

2009

During the Balkan Youth & Sport Forum 2009 more than 40 youth leaders, representing over 11 countries, assembled in Sarajevo, Bosnia Herzegovina, to share our experiences and ideas for youth development. During the forum, we attended non-formal workshops, training sessions and had passionate discussions about the issues plaguing our communities across Balkan. From these discussions, an over-arching theme emerged and held prominence: ‘Balkan Youth - What is the future?’

One part of future must be the important challenge to have youth engaged and involved in their communities, e.g., in decision- making processes. We see this as a cultural crosscutting process, where youth are regarded as equal citizens to development as opposed to token participation. This means that young people must and should be at the table when decisions regarding their communities are being made, no matter the authority, agency, or level of government. This must be reflected in policy and budgetary priorities.

We, the youth of Balkan, are motivated to be part of a continually bonding of cultures, religions and nations in the Balkan region, with our unshakable belief in the principles of tolerance, equity, and transparency. We call for NGOs, GOs and institutions to show interest in our beliefs, and to do so by supporting us in our efforts to improve participation of youth through democratic citizenship and non-formal education.

This declaration should be considered as a dynamic document, from where we all can engage in discussion and action planning around the issue of youth participation. 

2008

The European Youth and Sport Forum 2008 (EYSF2008) gathered over 100 European young people from 32 different countries. Following the European Union presidency the Forum took place in France from the 30th of November to the 6th of December.

The Forum used the principles and practise of non‐formal education as means to reach its aims of bringing youth from diverse backgrounds together to network and engage in the exchange of ideas.

This year’s EYSF aims to demonstrate how young people put the words of the White Paper on Sport, the European Commission’s policy document, into practice. The EYSF 2008 delivers much more than recommendations, it delivers options and solutions for citizens, volunteers, professionals and decision makers to questions posed in the White Paper. It does this through two different formats of responses to the White Paper, which are collected in our own ‘Pink Paper’. One is the declaration, a document made up of significant recommendations, presenting the youth perspective and response to the White Paper. In the second, participants contributed their ‘best practice examples’ in order to form a catalogue, which gathers information on various initiatives and serve as impetus for all organisations to join in these efforts in a political and structural sense.

Through networking at the Forum, participants learnt about different projects and programmes that may assist them with their work by promoting active citizenship and facilitate future European integration. In the long run programs like these are essential to focus on the European youth, sport and cultural programmes and the impact that they could have on civil society in the coming years.

On the final day of the EYSF2008 the ‘Pink Paper’ was presented to French and European political institutions and representatives. It is hoped that the recommendations of the ‘Pink Paper’ will influence future European and national agendas and will be discussed during the Czech Republic EU presidency at the next sport directors meeting and youth ministers meeting.

As participants, we will continue to use the recommendations in the ‘Pink Paper’ in our own countries. We look to you, whether from non‐governmental organisations, government, or other institutions to use the ‘Pink Paper’ to help to make our vision of sport a reality in Europe. 

2008

The examples of good practice in this guide were submitted by the participants of the 2008 European Youth and Sport Forum held in Paris between November 30th and December 1st 2008. All of the participants at the Forum worked or volunteered within the field of sport in their home country, and many of them showcased examples of good practice during the Forum itself.

The theme of the Forum was “add your colour”, looking at both the recent White Paper on Sport and the Youth in Action programme run by the European Commission. The Forum looked to make a response to the White Paper, titled “The Pink Paper: From Theory to Practice”. This Pink Paper consisted of a declaration summarising recommendations and actions put forward by the youth of Europe, and a good practice guide highlighting some of the examples of good practice already being used in the field of youth sport in Europe.

“Add your colour” focussed on the following themes of the White Paper:

  • Public health and physical activity

  • Education and training

  • Volunteering in sport, active citizenship and non-profit sport organisations

  • Social inclusion in and through sport

  • Prevention of and fight against racism and violence in sport

  • Sustainable development

It is hoped that the examples of good practice featured here will inspire and motivate others involved in youth sport in Europe. 

2007

The European Youth and Sport Forum 2007 took place from the 17th– 22nd June 2007 in Bonn, Germany.

The Declaration reflects the beliefs and desires of young people directly involved in sport and are designed to assist in the development of future policies on sport in Europe.

The Forum brought together young people from 22 European countries to discuss and exchange ideas on intercultural communication, discrimination, diversity and social inclusion in sport. The themes of the EYSF2007 were chosen to compliment the German EU-presidency themes including social inclusion and diversity.

At a time when physical activity amongst young people is increasingly being discussed in Europe, we hope that the European Commission, the Ministries responsible for sport and youth and sport organisations across Europe will take note of the recommendations.

The participants engaged in a variety of learning methods, both formal and non-formal. The actions that the participants ask you to implement have been divided into three fields that they feel cut across all of the themes: formal education, non formal education and communication, which are all of equal importance. The participants felt strongly that the principles underlying youth sport should include fair play, tolerance and understanding, and equality through opportunities for all regardless of ability.

The participants do not ask you to do this alone; involving local communities and organisations is seen as integral to the success of any work in these areas. For the future it is important that we all work together to achieve our vision of society in Europe.

The enthusiasm and engagement of the participants throughout the Forum was a credit to them and their countries and the recommendations outlined in this document are wholly those of the participants, arising from their ideas and discussions.

The case studies provided are examples presented by participants at the Forum. They are projects and programmes that the participants have been directly involved in and in many instances have led to their participation in the Forum. They are offered as examples of successful initiatives involving young people and are recommended for implementation in other European countries. 

2006

The European Youth and Sport Forum took place from the 26th September – 1st October 2006 in Pajulahti, Finland.

 

The Forum brought together young people from 32 European countries to discuss and exchange ideas on health, equality and active citizenship. The themes of the EYSF2006 were chosen to compliment the Finnish EUpresidency themes. The Finnish EU-presidency is campaigning for the recognition of voluntary organisations in Europe and for horizontal sport policies across all sectors.

 

The enthusiasm and engagement of the participants through out the Forum was a credit to them and their countries, and the recommendations outlined in this document are wholly those of the participants, arising from their ideas and discussions.

 

The Declaration reflects the beliefs and desires of young people directly involved in sport and are designed to assist in the development of future policies on sport in Europe.

 

At a time when physical activity amongst young people is increasingly being discussed in Europe, we hope that the European Commission, the Ministries responsible for sport and youth and sport organisations across Europe will take note of the recommendations and include them in the forthcoming White Paper on Sport; shaping and ensuring a bright future for all Europeans.

 

The participants do not ask you to do this alone; they are committed and willing to do their own part to full fill these recommendations. For the future it is important that we work together for a healthier and more active Europe.

 

During the Forum we have participated in both formal and non-formal methods of education. We believe that the opportunity to learn both in classes and seminars but also via activities and games is vital and recommend that this process is used in all programmes and projects involving volunteers and sport.

 

The case studies provided under each heading are examples presented by participants at the Forum. They are projects and programmes that the participants have been directly involved in and in many instances have led to their participation in the Forum. They are offered as examples of successful initiatives involving young people and are recommended for implementation in other European countries.

2005

The European Youth and Sport Forum took place from the 19th - 24th November 2005 at Stoke Mandeville Sports Stadium in the United Kingdom.

 

The Forum brought together young people from 28 European countries to discuss the issues of volunteering in sport, combating discrimination, and health and sport under the general theme of ‘creating a culture of volunteering and citizenship throughout Europe’.

 

The recommendations outlined in this document are constructed from the ideas of the participants, arising from workshops and discussions over the six days of the Forum. The recommendations do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the organisers.

 

The recommendations are designed to assist the European Commission, the Council of Europe and Non-Governmental Organisations in Europe in developing their future strategies for European sport and recreation.

 

The Forum has provided young people with an opportunity to voice their opinions and the recommendations are true reflection of their experiences and lives in modern Europe. It is vital that their voices are heard; both to ensure that European policy making is successful and in recognition of their role in the future construction of Europe.

 

We hope that the Declaration will achieve the desired affect. 

2002

109 young people from 23 different countries and representing a wide range of sports and sports associations met in Århus 18-23 November 2002, in order to discuss the following themes:

  1. Health and sport

  2. Doping

  3. Education through sport

 

The participants have written this charter as a summary of their conclusions of their meeting, and appreciate the opportunity to present it to the Ministers responsible for sports. For each of the three themes that they discussed, their conclusions and statements can be found in this document.

2013

ENGSO Youth welcomes European wide initiatives that promote youth-employment in the sport sector, and highlight the transferable skills that sport can develop. We are committed to supporting actions in favour of improving the opportunities of employment for young people across Europe.

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Youth Sport for Climate Action; policy paper

Undoubtedly climate change is shaping the future of our planet. It has many social implications, varying from the displacement of communities, threatened local livelihoods and decreased recreational opportunities.

Global warming is placing our future generations at risk.

 

From Poland to Colombia to Australia, thousands of young people are protesting and marching to encourage new policies towards the planet’s protection, raise awareness of the tremendous impacts of climate change and global warming and demand that action be taken at the political level.

Sport and Active Citizenship: The European Parliamentary Elections 2019 - The ENGSO Youth Position

There are a number of young citizens who are growing frustrated and disengaged with politics in Europe. Social exclusion, marginalization and extremism still represent a great threat to the younger generations.

Europe is facing a number of internal and external challenges from rising populist political agendas and Brexit to rapidly changing global political, economic and security landscapes.

 

There are a number of young citizens who are growing frustrated and disengaged with politics in Europe.

 

Social exclusion, marginalization and extremism still represent a great threat to the younger generations. As a consequence, ENGSO Youth echoes views of the European Youth Forum, according to which ‘the European Union needs to be reinvented, injected with fresh ideas and visions, to transform itself into an entity that young people want to engage with’.

What’s in there for You(th)? ENGSO Youth’s Position on the post-2020 EU youth & sport funding

The Erasmus programme is one of the greatest achievements of the European Union. From 2014 on the so called Erasmus+ provides a great variety of opportunities for young people and for the first time it incorporates a funding for European sport projects.

 

As the new Multiannual Financial Framework will begin in 2021, a new era for EU youth and sport funding will take up soon.

 

At ENGSO Youth we took a look at the Commission’s plans to reveal what opportunities are foreseen for young Europeans involved in sport activities. The short analysis is complemented with our recommendations in order to strengthen youth voice throughout the lengthy EU inter-institutional negotiations. Take a look at our position paper here.

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